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Advancing Justice: ‘Supreme Court sided with fear’

The U.S. Supreme Court today announced that it will hear the government’s appeal of the lower court rulings blocking the Muslim ban. The court also reinstated part of the administration’s Muslim ban, restricting some travelers from six Muslim-majority countries.

The court’s decision allows foreign nationals with close familial relationships with someone in the U.S. to live with or visit the United States. It also allows workers who accept an offer of employment from an American company, students enrolled in an American university, or a lecturer invited to address an American audience to come to the United States.

Asian Americans Advancing Justice (Advancing Justice), an affiliation of five civil rights organizations, is deeply disappointed in the Court’s decision and vows to continue providing immediate support to impacted members of the Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim, and South Asian communities.

After the first Muslim ban, staff members from our affiliation were among the first responders at airports across the country working to secure the release of individuals unlawfully detained at airports.

As litigation worked its way through the courts, we have provided legal and Know Your Rights assistance to impacted communities, and have opposed efforts to establish backdoor Muslim ban policies.

Advancing Justice joined the Korematsu Center in filing amicus briefs in multiple courts against the administration’s Muslim ban executive orders.

Advancing Justice released a statement following the court’s ruling:

“Today we are deeply disappointed that the Supreme Court sided with fear while blindly ignoring the hardships faced by refugees and visa seekers. Many Arab, Middle Eastern, Muslim, and South Asian communities have suffered greatly since the first Muslim ban was issued. The administration’s Muslim ban foments disturbing trends of anti-Muslim sentiments within the U.S. and abroad. The Supreme Court should not have allowed any part of the Muslim ban to move forward while this executive order is under review.

The Muslim ban restrains travel and freedom of movement for the communities affected without a rational basis. Any attempt to limit travel based on religion or country of origin is an egregious attack on the Constitution. From the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II to the Muslim ban today, xenophobia has fanned the flames of fear and hatred, driving immigration policy in irrational ways.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth and Ninth Circuits got it right in declaring the Muslim ban unconstitutional. We will continue to oppose any and all threats to the communities we represent. We will stay vigilant to any future efforts from every part of this administration to ban religious or ethnic communities, including through backdoor policies.”

#AAPIsResist Twitter Town Hall: One Year After Pulse

Miss the chat? Check out the storify here.

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As we near the end of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM), and into LGBTQ and Immigration Heritage Month, we also approach the 1-year anniversary since the Pulse club-shooting massacre. How can we heal in these trying times? How do we challenge ongoing forms of homophobia, transphobia, and xenophobia within our own communities?

Find the questions @AAPIsResist or see below.

Questions

  1. Let’s get started. What does queer justice look like for LGBTQ people of color? #AAPIsResist
  2. How can we fight homophobia and transphobia within ourselves? #AAPIsResist
  3. In what ways are AAPI communities impacted by homophobia and transphobia? #AAPIsResist
  4. How can we fight/shift homophobia and transphobia within our AAPI communities? #AAPIsResist
  5. Pride has always been political but is now being overtaken by big banks like Wells Fargo. How can we challenge the corporatization of Pride?
  6. What roles can allies play in fighting for Queer Justice? How do we build more co-conspirators? #AAPIsResist
  7. Almost a year we lost the lives of 49 #LGBTQ community members in #PulseMassacre #OrlandoShooting, how can we honor them in our daily lives?
  8. Why is understanding the intersections of LGBTQ identity important in strengthening our work? #AAPIsResist
  9. In AAPI families, coming out can be seen as dishonoring parents. How can we facilitate intergenerational understanding of LGBTQ experiences?
  10. Let’s shout it out! Share resources and organizations you know doing radical + inclusive LGBTQ liberation work. #AAPIsResist
  11. Finally, what will you commit to in order to create a world free of homophobia and transphobia? #AAPIsResist

Follow the co-hosts and the hashtag #AAPIsResist on Twitter:

  • 18millionrising – @18millionrising
  • Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance – @APALANational
  • Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon – @APANONews
  • National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance – @NQAPIA

#AAPIsResist Twitter Town Hall: Beyond the Moment

Miss the chat? Check out the storify here.

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Join us on Twitter today at 3pm ET / 12pm PT for a Twitter Town Hall on Forms of Activism, co-hosted by 18millionrising, Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance, Empowering Pacific Islander Communities, Improving South Asian American Students’ Experiences, National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum, and Reappropriate.

Find the questions @AAPIsResist or see below.

Questions

  1. Let’s get started. What does “Beyond the Moment” mean to you and for #AAPIs in general? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  2. May 18th is Vincent Chin’s birthday, the 19th is Yuri Kochiyama’s. How can we look to our history to inform our resistance?
  3. What are some examples of shared struggles between different movements? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  4. What does it look like to unite movements? What does it mean by “organizing at the intersections”? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  5. What or who are we organizing, resisting, and fighting back against? And what for? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  6. Let’s get more specific. What does it mean to stand with #BlackLivesMatter & @MovementForBlackLives #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  7. How do we elevate immigrant and refugee voices and issues without endangering our friends and families? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  8. Why is it so important to listen to Indigenous, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  9. How do we build a pipeline of women, transgender, & gender non-conforming folx in places of influence? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  10. How does climate/environmental justice come into play? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  11. What are some best practices/tips to shift negative and racist narratives? #AAPIsResist #BeyondtheMoment
  12. In five words or less, what’s your vision for a world #BeyondtheMoment. #AAPIsResist

Follow the co-hosts and the hashtag #AAPIsResist on Twitter:

  • 18millionrising – @18millionrising
  • Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance – @APALANational
  • Empowering Pacific Islander Communities – @EmpoweredPI
  • Improving South Asian American Students’ Experiences – @ISAASEtweets
  • National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum – @NAPAWF
  • Reappropriate – @Reappropriate

#AAPIsResist Twitter Town Hall: Forms of Activism

Miss the chat? Check out the storify here.

General

Join us on Twitter today at 3pm ET / 12pm PT for a Twitter Town Hall on Forms of Activism, co-hosted by Asian Americans Advancing Justice, Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance, National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum, National Religious Campaign Against Torture, Reappropriate, and South Asian Americans Leading Together

Find the questions @AAPIsResist or see below.

Questions

  1. Let’s get started. Show us how you #resist.
  2. During the #NoMuslimBanEver Week of Resistance, how can we protect and stand up for Muslim or perceived-to-be Muslim communities?
  3. Why do we say #NoMuslimBanEver?
  4. Let’s talk about state-sponsored violence. What does that include?
  5. How do we disrupt attempts to criminalize & oppress Muslim, immigrant, refugee, women, & POC communities? What does it mean 2 be an ally?
  6. #AAPIs are #NotYourModelMinority. Why is combatting this important? (
  7. This month is also #APAHM! Who in the #AAPI community is a role model of resistance?
  8. How can art be a form of #resistance?
  9. What are some tips for talking with family, friends and co-workers?
  10. How can our communities heal/deal with trauma? Why is self-care so important?
  11. How do I get plugged into #AAPI #resistance efforts near me?

Follow the co-hosts and the hashtag #AAPIsResist on Twitter:

  • Asian Americans Advancing Justice – @AAAJ_AAJC
  • Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance – @APALANational
  • National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum – @NAPAWF
  • National Religious Campaign Against Torture – @NRCATtweets
  • Reappropriate – @Reappropriate
  • South Asian Americans Leading Together – @SAALTweets

SAALT: Law Enforcement Should Investigate Bias as Motivation in Latest South Asian American Killings

South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT), a national South Asian civil rights organization, mourns the loss of life in separate killings of South Asian Americans last week in California and Michigan, and demands that law enforcement investigate whether racial or religious animus motivated any of these incidents.

On May 4, Dr. Ramesh Kumar was found shot dead in his car on a highway near Detroit, Michigan. Hours later in a separate incident in Modesto, California, Jagjeet Singh, a convenience store clerk, was stabbed to death by a customer outside his shop. Racial motivations have been alleged in both cases.

“Our communities have faced a hostile climate of hate for years, with particular intensity since President Trump took office. This makes race as a possible motivation in these tragic killings a very real possibility,” stated Suman Raghunathan, Executive Director of SAALT. “The President’s divisive rhetoric and policies have fanned the flames of violence against our communities since his campaign, and now in his Presidency. Unfortunately, broad swaths of our nation’s residents face hostility and violence as a result of the xenophobic and anti-Muslim rhetoric advanced by President Trump.”

Read more on SAALT.org